Talk:Black Box

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Jihad Conspiracies: Interstellar Players 2 Info[edit]

I added a sentence about the material in Jihad Conspiracies: Interstellar Players 2, but can't figure out where to find the abbreviation for the book to do the reference. Anyway, it's on page 12. Adamv (talk) 19:56, 25 June 2020 (EDT)

Channels?[edit]

What do the channels on a black box do? That would be helpful information. — The preceding unsigned comment was provided by 100.6.97.238 (talkcontribs) .

It's not explained anywhere (afaik). In the quoted source (Handbook: House Davion, p. 182) it is mentioned that newer, multi-channel devices are backwards compatible with older models but only if properly set by the user. This seems to establish that the "channels" are something like bandwidth, serving as a multiplier for the amount of data that can be sent. The stats do not seem to reflect this, however, or at least there doesn't seem to be a correlation between channels used and overall performance increase: The K-3, the first design with two channels, is identical to its 1-channel K-2 predecessor except for a slightly better encryption and a 50ly increase in range (from 450 to 500). The K-4 has twice the signal propagation speed, 20 pages message capacity instead of 6, a 600ly range, a 8ly instead of 5ly extra-long range incremental, and even better encryption - but still only 2 channels. The K-5 doubles channels from 2 to 4 but doesn't significantly improve over the K-4 (1.5 times signal propagation, 800ly range, 35 pages, and yet better encryption). The only reasonable explanation I can come up with is that the number of channels can improve the encryption, but the engineers didn't realize or use that potential until they jumped from K-3 to K-4. These two have the largest overall leap in performance between them, but both are 2-channel devices. Frabby (talk) 03:54, 3 September 2019 (EDT)