BattleRun II: The Quest for the Thing

Emblem-important.svg Not Canon!
The subject of this article does not contribute canonical content to the BattleTech universe, either because it is not intended to or because it is not an official product.
See the article's section on Canonicity for details.


BattleRun2.jpg
BattleRun II: The Quest for the Thing
Product information
Type Sourcebook/Adventure
(April Fools joke)
Author Jason Hardy
Pages 14
Cover artwork Kat Hardy
Publication information
Publisher Catalyst Game Labs
Product code E-CAT28F001
First published 1 April 2020
MSRP (free)
Content
Era Eighth World timeline Jihad
Series April Fools releases
Preceded by BattleRun: Best Ever

BattleRun II: The Quest for the Thing was Catalyst Game Labs' free 2020 April Fools product. It is a sequel to their 2009 April Fools product, BattleRun: Best Ever. As such, it foregoes the "Eighth World" worldbuilding section from the previous book and is significantly shorter.

The adventure is not dated, but takes place after the Best Ever tournament that was set in 3076 in the Eighth World timeline.

Plot synopsis[edit]

Having won the Best Ever tournamend and generally achieved everything there is to achieve, Jonas Hadry feels bored. To find new purpose, he and his team (the players) accept a mission from a mysterious "Mr. Johnson" to retrieve an object called the Infinity Grail. This involves meeting Katherine Steiner-Davion in disguise, the dragon Lofwyr, a floating battleship (a reference to CGL's Leviathans game), a trip to Obeedah, and a battle against a squad from LBI ("League of the Batshit Insane", the Eighth World Word of Blake analogue).

Content[edit]

(The book does not contain a table of contents.)

  • The Rains of Solaris (intro fiction)
  • Introduction
    • Adventure summary
  • The Call
  • The Meet
  • Legwork
  • Johnson
  • A Long Journey
  • Trial of Blood, Right?
  • The Battle for the Grail
  • Aftermath
  • Cast of Shadows

Canonicity[edit]

As an April Fools product, BattleRun II: The Quest for the Thing is explicitly considered non-canonical.