Guardian ECM Suite

(Redirected from Guardian ECM)
Clan = ECM Suite

IS = Guardian ECM Suite

Production information
Type Equipment (Electronics)
Tech Base Clan


Year Availability Clan = 2832

IS = 3045

Year Introduced Clan = 2832 CSJ

IS = 2597 TH

Year Extinction IS = 2845
Year Reintroduced IS = 3045 CC
Technology Rating E
Availability Ratings E/F/D
Technical specifications
Heat 0
Minimum Range 0
Short Range 0
Medium Range 0
Long Range 6
Tons Clan = 1

IS = 1,5

Critical Slots Clan = 1

IS = 2

Cost (unloaded) 200,000
BV (1.0) 61
BV (2.0) 61

This article is about the ECM Suite. For other uses, see Guardian (disambiguation).


The Guardian ECM Suite was introduced in 2597 by the Terran Hegemony[1]. Designed to interfere with guided weaponry, targeting computers, and communication systems, the Guardian is typically used to shield allied units from such equipment by emitting a broad-band signal meant to confuse radar, infrared, ultraviolet, magscan and sonar sensors.[2] The Terran Hegemony built the Guardian for fear that their own Beagle Active Probe, constructed as a counter to ECM suites in use at the time, might fall into the hands of the other Great Houses and be used against them.[3]

The suite itself consists of a dedicated countermeasures computer tied to electromagnetic sensors positioned around the operating unit. When these sensors detect an electromagnetic wave within range, such as that given off by an active radar, this data is sent to the computer which identifies the threat, adapts to it, and fires a focused electromagnetic pulse at the source. This intense burst of EM radiation can confuse and misdirect the sensor or even force the entire targeting system to reboot.[3]

Affected systems include Artemis IV, C3 and C3i Computer networks, and Narc Missile Beacons. A Guardian can jam a Beagle Active Probe (or its Clan equivalent), but the probe-equipped unit will be aware of the jamming. The Capellan Confederation expanded the utility of the Guardian even more with the introduction of Stealth Armor.[4] Contemporary guided missiles such as standard LRM or Streak SRMs are not affected by the Guardian suite and will be able to achieve hard lock as normal.[5]

The greatest drawback to the Guardian is its limited range, which extends out to only 180 meters. Sensors can sometimes override this jamming, though by that point the enemy unit is already within visual range and can track the opposition with their own eyes.[2] Another is the fact that the Guardian's highly-adaptable operating software requires constant patching and custom recoding for each unit model on which it's mounted. While this was no problem for the Star League, for the Great Houses it proved to be a time-consuming process.[3]

The Clans used the Guardian as the basis for their own ECM Suite, which is lighter and more compact than the Inner Sphere model but functions identically. The Draconis Combine used the Guardian as the basis for their experimental Angel ECM Suite.[6]


Guardian ECM Suite is manufactured on the following planets:

Brand Planet Company
Apple Churchill Golden Shield Capella Ceres Metals Industries
CherrySeed Cloak Arc-Royal Winston-CherrySeed Consolidated
Garret-Guardian Interface 2B Mendham Mendham Electronics
Garret-Guardian Interface 2B Dalton Garret SatComm
New Samarkand Nimbus New Samarkand New Samarkand Metals
Norse Guardian ECM Loxley Norse-Storm Technologies Incorporated


Game Rules[edit]

The Inner Sphere Guardian ECM weighs 1.5 tons and takes up 2 critical spaces. It has an operational range of six hexes.[7][8] The Guardian ECM Suite has a defensive Battle Value of 61.[9]

The Clan ECM Suite system weighs 1 ton and occupies a single critical space. In every other way it's identical to the Inner Sphere version.[10][11]


  1. TechManual, p. 213
  2. 2.0 2.1 Technical Readout: 3050, p. 197
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Era Report: 2750, p. 102-103
  4. TechManual, p. 213
  6. Tactical Operations, p. 279
  7. Technical Readout: 3050, p. 220
  8. TechManual, p. 342
  9. TechManual, p. 317
  10. TechManual, p. 342
  11. TechManual, p. 317